Coastal Scenes with Sam Mitchell and the Fantôme Kino B&W ISO 8 Film

If you happen to stumble upon Glasgow-based photographer Sam Mitchell's Instagram page, you'll see a flurry of arresting monochrome portraits and street photos, all shot on film. We were so taken in by Sam's talent that we decided to set him a challenge. We sent him a roll of Fantôme Kino B&W ISO 8 film which he set to work testing out and, in this interview, he shares his experiences and some useful advice on shooting low iso film.

Hello Sam, tell us a bit about yourself?

My name is Sam Mitchell and I’m a photographer based in Glasgow, I mainly shoot impromptu portraits of friends and strangers who capture my interest, I also shoot cityscapes and the ever-growing social side of the skate scene in Glasgow

What did you choose to shoot?

I chose to shoot a recent trip to Devon and document this amazing place from country roads and moorland to old crofts and self-portraits.

What equipment did you use with this film?

I used a tripod as it was recommended while using a low ISO film however I also used a 1.8 lens at 1/125 as this allowed me to shoot handheld.

How did you find shooting with this film, were you surprised by the results?

I had never previously shot a low ISO film however with some research into Fantôme 8 I felt confident that I could effectively use this film and when looking over the results I found it to be a very versatile film in terms of the contrast of black and white and detail, this film instantly reminded me of the work of Anton Corbijn and will definitely be using it again.

Any tips and tricks for future Fantôme Kino B&W ISO 8 Film users? For what purposes would you recommend the film?

I would definitely keep a tripod to hand for landscapes and buildings to be able to perfectly capture detail and also using a fast lens able to shoot at a small F-number such as 1.8 which is what I used.

To See more of Sam's work visit his Instagram page.

2021-09-16

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